A.C.E. to Host Student/Staff Softball Game

By Mara Shapiro

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A Poster for the Student/Staff Softball Game. Photo by Iza Swider.

Niles West A.C.E.(Athletes Committed to Excellence) will be hosting a student/staff softball game Monday, April 30 in the varsity softball field.

Participants  must sign up at A.C.E. sponsor Richard Costante’s desk in the main office by Friday, April 27. In order to play, the cost is $8. Teachers who have shown interest have been P.E. teachers Teri Langston and Jason Macejak.

A.C.E. sponsor and P.E. teacher Nicole Reynolds  feels that the softball game is a great way to have students compete against their teachers and past student/staff games have been successful.

“We wanted to have a staff/student softball game because all the kids love the game and love having the football and basketball games so we wanted to do one in the spring.  A.C.E. will be doing all of the games from now on and each will be for a different charity or community reason.  We had the toy drive in December which was very successful,” Reynolds says.

All proceeds will go to the Ovarian Cancer Research Fund.

Senior A.C.E. member Lexi Leftakes feels that the game will allow students to have fun with friends while supporting a good cause.

“It’s a great way to come out and help raise money for cancer and it will also be fun playing softball against the teachers and just being with your friends,” Leftakes says.

Senior A.C.E. member Sam Chao feels that the game will bring more awareness to Ovarian cancer and will allow softball players to get involved with the cause.

“Ovarian cancer has kind of been pushed aside as an issue because of the enormous focus on breast cancer. We’re trying to raise awareness for another disease plaguing women that can be just as traumatic and life-threatening. Both of our sponsors, Reynolds and Costante, are involved in the softball program, so it made things a lot easier because they know the game and they can get their players involved because they’re willing to cancel practice so the girls can come out and play,” Chao says.