The Lowdown On Lollapalooza

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Summer in Chicago is full of unpredictable weather (will it be 90º or 55º tomorrow, who knows), great food, amazing beaches, but most anticipatedly Lollapalooza. Lollapalooza in short is a three-day crazy diverse music festival of over 150 artists spread through seven stages plus one Kidspalooza stage.

Lollapalooza has been based in Grant Park since the summer of 2005. As a destination festival, thousands of people travel to Chicago late July to early August to see their favorite artists. Most importantly though, is us Chicagoans that go. Even more relevant: it’s a gigantic attraction for teenagers in the Chicagoland area. Just about every high school around Chicago is represented at Lollapalooza.

“Being with my close friends the whole day at Lollapalooza, getting to bump into people I knew whenever a new artist came on, even getting ready for it–the atmosphere was amazing,” junior Lizzy Blankenheim fondly recalls about this years festival. “What’s done at Lolla stays at Lolla,” she goes on to joke.

It doesn’t take a genius to figure out there was some underage drinking going on at Lollapalooza even though the security was tight-knit. This year a total of 34 people were arrested and over 200 hospitalized. Only a handful of those hospitalizations were underage alcohol and drug related. Thankfully, Niles West students were smart and none of those people were Wolves.

“It was in the 90’s the whole day and on top of that you’re surrounded by people, pushing through the crowd, trying to get to the front. You get dehydrated and thirsty real fast.” senior Joey Guliana explains. Although there were free Camelbak water filling stations at every stage, lines were long and you wouldn’t want to get out of that great spot you yelled, pushed and made enemies for.

“The water line was insane, but ohmygod my feet hurt so bad and I was sweating so much,” junior Alen Radeljic continues, “but seriously, Lollapalooza was turnt. Best three days of my summer and money well spent.” With early bird three-day passes at $250, normal three-days at $275, and single day passes at $110, tickets sold out quick.

“Yeah, as a teenager, spending $255 is a lot, but I also saw 20 of my favorite artists perform back to back with my closest friends. That’s about the same price as a mediocre seat to watch one artist on tour. It’s 100% worth the money, no doubt about it,” senior Nichole Lopatin shares.

If you have some free time before your next artist is on, Lollapalooza provides for you. They have a small “Farmer’s Market” where you can buy clothes, get flash tattoos, and buy some art that caught your eye. They will also make sure you’re not getting hungry, so food stations are set up through the whole festival area. Take note that Chicago brings their A-Game with cuisine, so Lolla food this year included Lou Malnati’s, Cheesies, Original Rainbow Cone, The Crave Bar, and over 30 more delicious spots that had Lobster Corn Dogs (a must have dish, highly recommended).

“Honestly, I wish I went this year. It sounded like everyone had the time of their lives,” senior Stefan Vukasin mulls over his decision to not go this year.

Next year’s Lollapalooza will be from July 29th-31st; tickets go for sale on their website in the spring so you have time to think about how you’re going to save up or how you’re going to convince your parents to buy you tickets. Just remember to be smart about everything you’re doing, stay hydrated, wear comfortable shoes, and leave your negative vibes home.