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Portraits: 30 in 60

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Portraits: 30 in 60

Andy Sinclair welcoming everyone to the show.

Andy Sinclair welcoming everyone to the show.

Andy Sinclair welcoming everyone to the show.

Andy Sinclair welcoming everyone to the show.

By Jojo Beiza, Staff Writer

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West’s theatre students had just 60 minutes to perform 30 plays created by students at “Portraits: 30 in 60”, the Advanced Theatre Studio production. If time ran out, they were to stop wherever they were at in the performance.

Starting off the show at 5 pm, a group of four high schoolers who are in an improv group called The Howligans, got the crowd active as they did three improv activities. Not expecting that to happen, I was pleasantly surprised by the giggles that came out of me throughout the little bit.

The first play commenced with the students shouting “GO”.

“A Word on Juuling” by Kenan Ozer

As we know, juuling has become an overnight sensation for high schoolers here at West. “A Word on Juuling” brought some light into what seems to be the biggest concern among the adults around the school. Rhyming and getting a long, booming, and engaging laugh from the audience. I personally think that this was an amazing beginning to what was coming. Ozer’s play was a hit among the teenage viewers in the audience.

“$1.29” by Jake Olechno

Continuing the performances with a comedic vibe, this play was one for the books. Warned at the beginning of the play that some of the performances may leave us asking “what?”, this short act did exactly that. Walking up alone, with a bag of flaming hot cheetos, Olechno pulled out an unusually long receipt. Telling us that the only purchase he made at CVS was that bag of chips. He then proceeded to crumple up the receipt, shove it in his mouth, and walk off the center of the black box theater. This was definitely my favorite of the thirty plays because it was simple and out of the ordinary. Definitely would give this one a 10/10.

“Comments on an Instagram Post of Billie Eilish Pointing at a Mattress” by Angel Rivas

Like juuling, it’s no secret that Billie Eilish has become a staple for our teenage lives. In this play, fifteen students stood in a horizontal line and one by one, students came forward to recite comments on Billie’s posts. Comments included, “Date me please”, “Is that even vegan?”, “My mattress looks just like that!”, and so on. This play was one of my favorites, as it sparked a unique vibe and appealed to the students in the audience once again.

“Boi” by Abel Aboye

This play was by far the most realistic one yet. With just Aboye and Moe Dasser sitting at the center of the theater, the two high school boys continuously threw roasts at each other. I knew this was going to be a fun play when I heard the title, “Boi”.  Not only were the roasts humorous, but they were also definitely ones you have heard in the busy hall of Niles West. Definitely, one to watch.

“Watching the Drama from the Sidelines” by Anton Tomacic

This play had no words, just emotions. Walking up to the center, sophomore Anton Tomacic had a red mug in his hand along with a spoon. Sitting and stirring while giving sassy facials to the audience, Tomacic really captured what it’s like watching the drama from the sidelines. This was by far the cutest one yet.

All in all, I did not expect to enjoy the ATS show as much as I did. Whether you are a theater person or not, you are guaranteed a smile and a laugh. That, I can promise you.

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